Install Portuguesepedia’s WebApp directly from your browser. Here are the instructions for different devices:

Android Devices

  1. Open Chrome and navigate to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Tap the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Add: Select "Add to Home screen."
  4. Confirm: Tap "Add."
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia on your home screen.

Similar steps apply to Firefox and Microsoft Edge web browsers.

iOS Devices

Using Safari:

  1. Open Safari and visit Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Share: Tap the "Share" button (square with an arrow).
  3. Add: Scroll down and tap "Add to Home Screen."
  4. Name: Edit the name if desired, then tap "Add."
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia on your home screen.

Using Chrome:

  1. Open Chrome and navigate to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Tap the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Add: Select "Add to Home screen."
  4. Confirm: Tap "Add."
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia on your home screen.

Windows Devices

Using Edge:

  1. Open Edge and visit Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Install: Click the "Install" icon in the address bar or go to the menu (three dots) > "Apps" > "Install this site as an app."
  3. Confirm: Click "Install."
  4. Access: Find Portuguesepedia in your Start Menu or Desktop.

Using Chrome:

  1. Open Chrome and navigate to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Click the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Install: Select "Install [Portuguesepedia]."
  4. Confirm: Follow the prompts.

macOS Devices

Using Safari:

  1. Open Safari and go to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Add: Click the "Share" button > "Add to Home Screen."
  3. Name: Edit the name if desired, then tap "Add."

Using Chrome:

  1. Open Chrome and visit Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Click the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Install: Select "Install [Portuguesepedia]."
  4. Confirm: Follow the prompts.
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia in your Applications folder.

Linux Devices

Using Chrome:

  1. Open Chrome and go to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Click the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Install: Select "Install [Portuguesepedia]."
  4. Confirm: Follow the prompts.
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia in your app launcher.

Using Firefox:

  1. Open Firefox and navigate to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Click the menu (three lines) in the top-right corner.
  3. Add: Select "Add to Home screen."
  4. Confirm: Click "Add."

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This Is Why Portuguese Sounds Slavic

Being a Romance language, why does Portuguese – in specific European Portuguese – sound so Slavic?!

Despite being geographically distant and belonging to different language families, Portuguese seems to share certain phonological features with Slavic languages, which leads to the question: what are those features exactly? 

In this blog post, I will point out four phonological traits of European Portuguese that help explain its resemblance to Slavic languages. Read on.

Closed vowel sounds

Like several Slavic languages, closed vowel sounds are a prominent feature of European Portuguese.

Being a stressed-time language (as opposed to syllable-timed like other Romance languages), Portuguese produces fairly consistent time gaps between stressed syllables. 

That, in turn, implies vowel reduction in unstressed syllables so they can fit into those relatively fixed time slots between stressed ones.

Vowel reduction?

It’s more simple than it sounds. Vowel reduction means vowels become hastily pronounced, thus leading to closed vowel sounds (to allow unstressed syllables to fit into those fixed time slots mentioned above). 

Like Portuguese, Slavic languages are dominantly stressed-timed and, therefore, have a high frequency of damped, closed vowel sounds.

Nasal sounds

Portuguese and Slavic languages share a rich vowel system that includes nasalized vowels (note that nasal vowels are uncommon in other Romance languages). 

This nasalization gives the Portuguese language a distinctive, resonant quality setting it apart from other Romance languages. Accordingly, such nasal quality adds to the resemblance between Portuguese and Slavic languages.

Fricative sounds

European Portuguese is rich in fricative sounds, namely the /ʃ/ and /ʒ/ sounds, as in shade or measure respectively. 

(Fricative sounds are produced when the airflow passing through one’s vocal tract is constrained by a narrow passage. For the examples above, that narrow canal is formed by your tongue being pushed up against your hard palate.)

What’s more, these sounds are also a hallmark of Slavic languages. This is one more reason why Portuguese resembles the latter.

The dark L

Finally, the so-called dark L is salient in Portuguese and Slavic languages. 

You must be wondering what the dark L sounds like, right? 

Well, the dark L is thicker than the “normal” L-sound. For instance, compare the L-sounds in the words Lisbon and malware. Can you hear the difference? That’s exactly right: Lisbon has the “normal” one, whereas malware renders a fatter, darker sound – the dark L. 

Conclusion

The similarity between Portuguese and Slavic languages can be attributed to a few shared phonological features. In this short post, I briefly touched on four: the noticeable presence of closed vowel sounds, nasal sounds, fricative sounds, and the dark L.

I highly recommend this article if you want to dive deeper into this topic: Here’s Why Portuguese Sounds Russian.

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Learning European Portuguese? Portuguesepedia offers engaging learning materials to keep your motivation high and help you move toward fluency. I'm Pedro and I'm creating it all for you! Até já, p

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