No courses are scheduled for the time being. Fill up the form below and I will let you know when new dates are released.

In-person Intensive Courses Upcoming
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Intermediate B1

This intensive course is for language learners striving toward the B1 level. The language of instruction is Portuguese. I will speak in English only if need be.

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My suggestion for these two weeks is to focus on*:

  • Conversation
  • Listening comprehension
  • Reading comprehension
  • Compound tenses (Ter auxiliary) / Personal Infinitive / Imperative Mood / Present Subjunctive
  • Prepositional usage

*There's always room to adjust the course according to the group's preferences:

After this course, you'll have come closer to the B1 level and have the tools and strategies to get there and beyond.

Not sure if you should enroll in the A2 or B1 course?

Take this placement test

Any questions?

Inquiry

Beginners A2

This intensive course is for language learners striving toward the A2 level. The language of instruction is English/Portuguese typically in a 30/70 ratio. (I always speak with you in Portuguese as much as possible.)

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My suggestion for these two weeks is to focus on:

  • Listening comprehension
  • Oral interaction
  • Past tense (Perfeito vs. Imperfeito)
  • Prepositional usage
  • Any other aspects according to your preferences as a group

After this course, you'll have come closer to the A2 level and gained the tools to take it further all by yourself.

Not sure if you should enroll in the A2 or B1 course?

Take this placement test

Any questions?

Inquiry

Beginners A1

This intensive course is for language learners striving toward the A1 level. The language of instruction is English/Portuguese typically in a 60/40 ratio. (I always speak with you in Portuguese as much as possible.)

If you've just started your learning journey, it may be that you will find this course a bit challenging. Nothing wrong with that. However, if you want to take it easy, consider enrolling for the Clean Slate A0 instead (if available).

CEFR Scale

Learn more about the CEFR scale

This is an all-round course, which means that we’ll work on all aspects of language learning according to the A1 level*:

  • Pronunciation
  • Listening comprehension
  • Reading comprehension
  • Conversation
  • Grammar

* There's always room to adjust the course according to your preferences as a group.

After this course, you'll have come closer to the A1 level and gained the tools to take it further all by yourself.

Not sure if you should enroll in the A1 or A2 course?

Take this placement test

Any questions?

Inquiry

Clean Slate A0

Geared toward Absolute Beginners, this course gives you a solid start and foundation to build upon. The language of instruction is almost entirely in English.

CEFR Scale

This is an introductory course to the Portuguese language as spoken in Portugal. Throughout the course, we will focus on the Portuguese sound system and basic Portuguese grammar.

You will also learn how to introduce yourself and day-to-day, useful phrases. Finally, we will discuss learning resources and strategies to support your learning journey.

After the course, you will have a basic understanding of European Portuguese pronunciation and grammar. You will also be capable of engaging in simple, short oral interactions. Last but not least, you will be aware of a variety of learning resources and strategies to help you succeed at learning the language.

Any questions?

Inquiry

New dates covering the period Mar–Jun will soon be announced. Fill up this form and I will keep you posted.

Online Intensive Courses Upcoming
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Can't you attend any courses this season? Fill up this form and I will keep you posted on upcoming Intensive Courses.

In-person Intensive Courses Upcoming
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Surprise surprise!

Do you know what constipado means in Portuguese? Probably not what you are thinking...

Get a list of 50+ English-Portuguese False Friends and be surprised.

False Friends
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20 Portuguese Idioms and Expressions to Impress Locals

If you’re planning a trip to Portugal or simply looking to connect with Portuguese speakers, incorporating idioms and colloquial expressions into your conversations can make a significant difference. 

Learning these phrases will not only impress native speakers but also improve your idiomatic feel for the Portuguese language. 

With that said, let me show you 20 Portuguese idioms and colloquial expressions that will make you stand out in any conversation.

1. Bater as botas

Literally, Knocking one’s boots off, this idiom is the Portuguese equivalent of Kicking the bucket and is used to express that someone is or has passed away. 

While it may sound morbid, it’s a light-hearted way of talking about death in Portuguese.

2. Falar pelos cotovelos

Literally, To speak through one’s elbows, this expression refers to someone who talks excessively or is a chatterbox. If you encounter a talkative local, you can use this expression humorously to describe them.

3. Casa de ferreiro, espeto de pau

Literally, Blacksmith’s house, wooden spit, this idiomatic expression is the Portuguese equivalent of The shoemaker’s children go barefoot. 

In other words, this idiom means that someone is proficient in their profession but neglects to apply that expertise in their personal life. 

4. Quem não chora, não mama

Literally, If you don’t cry, you don’t get to suck, this expression is similar to the proverb The squeaky wheel gets the grease.

Accordingly, this saying encourages people to speak up and ask for what they want or need. It emphasizes the importance of being assertive in to achieve one’s desires.

5. Quem tem boca vai a Roma

This Portuguese expression is similar to the saying Whoever has a mouth goes to Rome. It highlights the power of communication and how speaking up can open doors and create opportunities.

6. Cão que ladra, não morde

Just like the saying Barking dogs never bite, this expression refers to people who make a lot of noise or threats but rarely take real action.

7. Águas passadas não movem moinhos

Literally, Bygone waters won’t turn the mill,  this Portuguese proverb is the equivalent of Let bygones be.  In other words, it advises letting go of the past and not dwelling on things that cannot be changed.

8. Quem espera, sempre alcança

This Portuguese saying encourages patience and persistence and is similar to All good things come to those who wait.

9. Estar com a pulga atrás da orelha

Literally, To have a flea behind one’s ear, we use this expression to refer to someone skeptical about a situation or suspicious about someone.

10. Cada macaco no seu galho 

Literally, Each monkey on its branch, this expression means that everyone should mind their own business or stick to their area of expertise.

11. Quem não arrisca, não petisca

Literally, No risk, no snacks, this idiomatic expression encourages taking risks to achieve rewards, much like the English saying, Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

12. Cuspido e escarrado

Sounding somewhat gross (Spat and slobbered), this one is used to say that someone closely resembles a parent or relative, both in appearance and behavior, like saying Spitting image in English.

13. Em terra de cego, quem tem um olho é rei

This saying suggests that even a person with limited abilities can excel in an environment where others have none, much like the English expression, In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

14. Pôr os pontos nos i’s

Being the Portuguese equivalent of Dotting the I’s and crossing the T’s, this expression means clarifying or resolving a situation by addressing all the important details.

15. Nem tanto ao mar, nem tanto à terra

Literally, Neither so much to the sea, nor so much to the land, this saying advises moderation and avoiding extremes in any situation.

16. Quem semeia ventos, colhe tempestades

Similar to the English saying, You reap what you sow, this phrase emphasizes the consequences of one’s actions. (It means, He who sows winds, reaps storms.)

17. A cavalo dado não se olha o dente

This expression advises against criticizing or being ungrateful for gifts or favors received and is the equivalent of Never look a gift horse in the mouth, or even, Beggars can’t be choosers. (The literal translation is Don’t look at the teeth of a gift horse.)

18. Mais vale tarde do que nunca

This timeless expression is the Portuguese equivalent of Never late than never and encourages embracing opportunities, even if they come later than expected.

19. Fazer alguma coisa em cima do joelho

Literally, Doing something on top of one’s knee, we use this idiom to refer to people rushing and doing things at the last minute.

20. Quem não tem cão, caça com gato

Literally, She who does not have a dog hunts with a cat, this saying compels you to make do with whatever is at hand, pretty much like the saying When Life Gives You Lemons, Make Lemonade.

Conclusion

Learning these Portuguese idioms and expressions will positively impress the locals and demonstrate your appreciation for their language and culture. By incorporating these sayings into your conversations, you’ll not only engage in meaningful interactions but also foster deeper connections with the people you meet. 

So, dive into the rich world of Portuguese idiomatic expressions (go back to the top and give it another run), and let your language skills shine during your next Portuguese adventure!

Stay tuned for upcoming courses, reads, and other novelties.

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