Install Portuguesepedia’s WebApp directly from your browser. Here are the instructions for different devices:

Android Devices

  1. Open Chrome and navigate to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Tap the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Add: Select "Add to Home screen."
  4. Confirm: Tap "Add."
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia on your home screen.

Similar steps apply to Firefox and Microsoft Edge web browsers.

iOS Devices

Using Safari:

  1. Open Safari and visit Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Share: Tap the "Share" button (square with an arrow).
  3. Add: Scroll down and tap "Add to Home Screen."
  4. Name: Edit the name if desired, then tap "Add."
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia on your home screen.

Using Chrome:

  1. Open Chrome and navigate to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Tap the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Add: Select "Add to Home screen."
  4. Confirm: Tap "Add."
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia on your home screen.

Windows Devices

Using Edge:

  1. Open Edge and visit Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Install: Click the "Install" icon in the address bar or go to the menu (three dots) > "Apps" > "Install this site as an app."
  3. Confirm: Click "Install."
  4. Access: Find Portuguesepedia in your Start Menu or Desktop.

Using Chrome:

  1. Open Chrome and navigate to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Click the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Install: Select "Install [Portuguesepedia]."
  4. Confirm: Follow the prompts.

macOS Devices

Using Safari:

  1. Open Safari and go to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Add: Click the "Share" button > "Add to Home Screen."
  3. Name: Edit the name if desired, then tap "Add."

Using Chrome:

  1. Open Chrome and visit Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Click the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Install: Select "Install [Portuguesepedia]."
  4. Confirm: Follow the prompts.
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia in your Applications folder.

Linux Devices

Using Chrome:

  1. Open Chrome and go to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Click the menu (three dots) in the top-right corner.
  3. Install: Select "Install [Portuguesepedia]."
  4. Confirm: Follow the prompts.
  5. Access: Find Portuguesepedia in your app launcher.

Using Firefox:

  1. Open Firefox and navigate to Portuguesepedia.com.
  2. Menu: Click the menu (three lines) in the top-right corner.
  3. Add: Select "Add to Home screen."
  4. Confirm: Click "Add."

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20 Portuguese Idiomatic Expressions to Impress Locals

Enhancing your conversations with Portuguese idioms and colloquial expressions will profoundly impact your language skills. Learning and using idiomatic expressions will not only impress native speakers but also boost your comprehension and intuitive grasp of the language. Let’s dive into 20 Portuguese idioms and proverbs to help you shine in any conversation.

1. Bater as botas

Literally, knocking one’s boots off, this idiom is the Portuguese equivalent of Kicking the bucket and is used to express that someone is or has passed away. 

While it may sound morbid, it’s a light-hearted way of talking about death in Portuguese.

2. Falar pelos cotovelos

Literally, to speak through one’s elbows, this expression refers to someone who talks excessively or is a chatterbox. If you encounter a talkative local, you can use this expression humorously to describe them.

3. Casa de ferreiro, espeto de pau

Literally, at blacksmith’s house, wooden spit, this idiomatic expression is the Portuguese equivalent of The shoemaker’s children go barefoot. 

In other words, this idiom conveys that someone may be proficient in their profession while neglecting to apply that expertise in their personal life. 

4. Quem não chora, não mama

Literally, if you don’t cry, you don’t get to suck, this expression is similar to the proverb The squeaky wheel gets the grease.

Accordingly, this saying encourages people to speak up and ask for what they want or need. It emphasizes the importance of being assertive to achieve one’s desires.

5. Quem tem boca vai a Roma

This Portuguese expression is similar to the saying Whoever has a mouth goes to Rome. It highlights the power of communication and how speaking up can open doors and create opportunities.

6. Cão que ladra, não morde

Just like the saying Barking dogs never bite, this expression refers to people who make a lot of noise or threats but rarely take real action.

7. Águas passadas não movem moinhos

Literally, bygone waters won’t turn the mill,  this Portuguese proverb is the equivalent of Let bygones be.  In other words, it advises letting go of the past and not dwelling on things that cannot be changed.

8. Quem espera, sempre alcança

This Portuguese saying encourages patience and persistence and is similar to All good things come to those who wait.

9. Estar com a pulga atrás da orelha

Literally, to have a flea behind one’s ear, we use this expression to refer to someone skeptical about a situation or suspicious about someone.

10. Cada macaco no seu galho 

Literally, each monkey on its branch, this expression means that everyone should mind their own business or stick to their area of expertise.

11. Quem não arrisca, não petisca

Literally, no risk, no snacks, this idiomatic expression encourages taking risks to achieve rewards, much like the English saying, Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

12. Cuspido e escarrado

Sounding gross (Spat and slobbered), this one conveys the idea that someone closely resembles a parent or relative, both in appearance and behavior, like saying Spitting image in English.

13. Em terra de cego, quem tem um olho é rei

This saying suggests that even a person with limited abilities can excel in an environment where others have none, much like the English expression, In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

14. Pôr os pontos nos i’s

Being the Portuguese equivalent of Dotting the I’s and crossing the T’s, this expression means clarifying or resolving a situation by addressing all the important details.

15. Nem tanto ao mar, nem tanto à terra

Literally, neither so much to the sea nor so much to the land, this saying advises moderation and avoiding extremes in any situation.

16. Quem semeia ventos, colhe tempestades

Like the English saying, You reap what you sow, this phrase emphasizes the consequences of one’s actions. (It means, He who sows winds, reaps storms.)

17. A cavalo dado não se olha o dente

This expression advises against criticizing or being ungrateful for gifts or favors received and is the equivalent of Never look a gift horse in the mouth, or even, Beggars can’t be choosers. (The literal translation is Don’t look at the teeth of a gift horse.)

18. Mais vale tarde do que nunca

This timeless expression is the Portuguese equivalent of Never late than never and encourages embracing opportunities, even if they come later than expected.

19. Fazer alguma coisa em cima do joelho

Literally, doing something on top of one’s knee, we use this idiom to refer to people rushing and doing things at the last minute.

20. Quem não tem cão, caça com gato

Literally, those who do not have a dog hunt with a cat, this saying compels you to make do with whatever is at hand, pretty much like the saying When Life Gives You Lemons, Make Lemonade.

If you want to learn more Portuguese colloquial expressions in a richer format, explore Listening Drills (under the category “Folk Wisdom”) and Idiomatic Dips.

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