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Intermediate B1

This intensive course is for language learners striving toward the B1 level. The language of instruction is Portuguese. I will speak in English only if need be.

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My suggestion for these two weeks is to focus on*:

  • Conversation
  • Listening comprehension
  • Reading comprehension
  • Compound tenses (Ter auxiliary) / Personal Infinitive / Imperative Mood / Present Subjunctive
  • Prepositional usage

*There's always room to adjust the course according to the group's preferences:

After this course, you'll have come closer to the B1 level and have the tools and strategies to get there and beyond.

Not sure if you should enroll in the A2 or B1 course?

Take this placement test

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Beginners A2

This intensive course is for language learners striving toward the A2 level. The language of instruction is English/Portuguese typically in a 30/70 ratio. (I always speak with you in Portuguese as much as possible.)

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My suggestion for these two weeks is to focus on:

  • Listening comprehension
  • Oral interaction
  • Past tense (Perfeito vs. Imperfeito)
  • Prepositional usage
  • Any other aspects according to your preferences as a group

After this course, you'll have come closer to the A2 level and gained the tools to take it further all by yourself.

Not sure if you should enroll in the A2 or B1 course?

Take this placement test

Any questions?

Inquiry

Beginners A1

This intensive course is for language learners striving toward the A1 level. The language of instruction is English/Portuguese typically in a 60/40 ratio. (I always speak with you in Portuguese as much as possible.)

If you've just started your learning journey, it may be that you will find this course a bit challenging. Nothing wrong with that. However, if you want to take it easy, consider enrolling for the Clean Slate A0 instead (if available).

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This is an all-round course, which means that we’ll work on all aspects of language learning according to the A1 level*:

  • Pronunciation
  • Listening comprehension
  • Reading comprehension
  • Conversation
  • Grammar

* There's always room to adjust the course according to your preferences as a group.

After this course, you'll have come closer to the A1 level and gained the tools to take it further all by yourself.

Not sure if you should enroll in the A1 or A2 course?

Take this placement test

Any questions?

Inquiry

Clean Slate A0

Geared toward Absolute Beginners, this course gives you a solid start and foundation to build upon. The language of instruction is almost entirely in English.

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This is an introductory course to the Portuguese language as spoken in Portugal. Throughout the course, we will focus on the Portuguese sound system and basic Portuguese grammar.

You will also learn how to introduce yourself and day-to-day, useful phrases. Finally, we will discuss learning resources and strategies to support your learning journey.

After the course, you will have a basic understanding of European Portuguese pronunciation and grammar. You will also be capable of engaging in simple, short oral interactions. Last but not least, you will be aware of a variety of learning resources and strategies to help you succeed at learning the language.

Any questions?

Inquiry

New dates covering the period Mar–Jun will soon be announced. Fill up this form and I will keep you posted.

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In-person Intensive Courses Upcoming
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Do you know what constipado means in Portuguese? Probably not what you are thinking...

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Portuguese Possessive Pronouns and Determiners

Portuguese possessive pronouns and determiners indicate possession. In English, these are words like myyourhis, her, our, their (possessive determiners) and mineyourshis, hersours, theirs (possessive pronouns):

Masculine singularFeminine singularMasculine pluralFeminine plural
my/mine(o) meu(a) minha(os) meus(as) minhas
your/yours(o) teu(a) tua(os) teus (as) tuas
his/hers(o) seu (a) sua(os) seus(as) suas
our/ours(o) nosso(a) nossa(os) nossos(as) nossas
yours(o) vosso (a) vossa(as) vossas (os) vossos 
their/theirs(o) seu(a) sua(os) seus(as) suas

As we can see, both possessive pronouns and determiners look the same in Portuguese. However, while determiners precede the noun they qualify, pronouns replace the noun altogether and thus stand alone:

Possessive determiners (precede the noun)
O meu carro é novo em folha. 
My car is brand new.

Possessive pronouns (stand-alone)
Aquele carro ali é meu.
That car over there is mine.

What’s more, Portuguese possessives agree in gender and number with the thing possessed (and not with the possessor):

O teu relógio é elegante. (o relógio)
Your watch is elegant.

A tua camisa está engelhada. (a camisa)
Your shirt is wrinkled.

Now, there’s much more to dig into this topic!

For example, we often use dele/dela instead of seu/sua when referring to a third person. Indeed, seu/sua is most commonly used as your/yours when addressing people with deference (in formal contexts).

If you want to dive deeper into this topic and develop a solid foundation in Portuguese grammar in general, I suggest you give All-round Beginners A1 a look (Possessive Pronouns are in Module 6).

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All-round Beginners

Reading tips! Learn more about gender and number in Portuguese:

Gender of Portuguese Words: A Guide to Masculine-to-Feminine Spelling Patterns
Forming the Plural in Portuguese: Singular-to-Plural Conversion Patterns to Keep an Eye On

Portuguese possessive determiners

Possessive determiners precede the noun they qualify and are normally preceded by a definite article:

Masculine singularFeminine singularMasculine pluralFeminine plural
myo meu amigoa minha amigaos meus amigosas minhas amigas
youro teu amigoa tua amigaos teus amigosas tuas amigas
your (formal)
his/her *
o seu amigoa sua amigaos seus amigosas suas amigas
ouro nosso amigoa nossa amigaos nossos amigosas nossas amigas
youro vosso amigoa vossa amigaas vossas amigasos vossos amigos
their *o seu amigoa sua amigaos seus amigosas suas amigas

* Refer to the “3-person de-possessives” below

Here are a few examples where it is clear that these determiners agree in gender and number with the possessed things:

Trouxeste os nossos livros?
Did you bring our books?

Gostei muito de conhecer os teus pais.
It was a pleasure to meet your parents.

Não sei onde pus as minhas lentes.
I don’t know where I put my lenses.

We often skip the possessive adjective when the relationship between the possessor and the possessed is implicit or obvious:

Vim de carro.
I came in my car.

A Joana falou ao telefone com a prima do Brasil.
Joana spoke on the phone with her cousin from Brazil.

Veste as calças!
Put your trousers on!

Portuguese possessive pronouns

Portuguese possessive pronouns replace the noun they refer to standing therefore alone. 

Masculine singularFeminine singularMasculine pluralFeminine plural
mine(o) meu(a) minha(os) meus(as) minhas
yours(o) teu(a) tua(os) teus (as) tuas
yours (formal)
his/hers*
(o) seu (a) sua(os) seus(as) suas
ours(o) nosso(a) nossa(os) nossos(as) nossas
yours(o) vosso (a) vossa(as) vossas (os) vossos 
theirs*(o) seu(a) sua(os) seus(as) suas

* Refer to the “3-person de-possessives” below

Notice how possessive pronouns, like possessive determiners, agree in gender and number with the noun they refer to and replace:

A minha guitarra soa melhor do que a tua.
My guitar sounds better than yours.

Os meus pais estão bem. E os teus?
My parents are well. What about yours?

Estas maçãs não são más, mas eu prefiro as nossas.
These apples are not bad but I prefer ours.

Now, in conjunction with the verb ser, possessive pronouns don’t require the preceding definite article (in this case, the article is optional and acts only as a reinforcement):

Aquele carro ali é (o) meu.
That car over there is mine.

Essas malas são (as) nossas.
Those suitcases are ours.

3-person de-possessives: dele(s), dela(s)

The possessives seu/sua/seus/suas can refer to the 2-person singular formal (você), 3-person singular (ele/ela), or 3-person plural (eles/elas). Thus, their usage often gives rise to confusion as to whom they refer to.

Instead, we tend to use de-possessives when referring to the 3-person singular and plural (I am calling these “de-possessives” because they result from the contraction between de and 3-person subject pronouns): 

MasculineFeminine
his/herdele
(de + ele)
dela
(de + ela)
theirdeles
(de + eles)
delas
(de + elas)

Contrarily to the possessives covered above, 3-person de-possessives agree in gender and number with the possessor, not the possessed (as his/her/their do).

Also, they came after the possessed thing, not before. Here are a few examples:

Já vi a casa dele.
I have already seen his house.

Ainda não conheceste a mãe dela?
Haven’t you met her mother yet?

Gosto mais da cultura deles do que da nossa.
I like their culture better than ours.

One last thing. 

Some verbs are often followed by the particle de, for instance, gostar de. Thus, dele/dela/deles/delas can be a mere contraction between de and an object pronoun, which has nothing to do with de-possessives.

Here are a couple of examples:

Eu gosto dele. (gostar de) 
I like him. 

Tu precisas deles. (precisar de)
You need them.

Reading tips! If you’ve enjoyed learning about Portuguese possessive pronouns, you might want to read this one as well: Portuguese Demonstrative Pronouns and Determiners.

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