No courses are scheduled for the time being. Fill up the form below and I will let you know when new dates are released.

In-person Intensive Courses Upcoming
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Intermediate B1

This intensive course is for language learners striving toward the B1 level. The language of instruction is Portuguese. I will speak in English only if need be.

CEFR Scale

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My suggestion for these two weeks is to focus on*:

  • Conversation
  • Listening comprehension
  • Reading comprehension
  • Compound tenses (Ter auxiliary) / Personal Infinitive / Imperative Mood / Present Subjunctive
  • Prepositional usage

*There's always room to adjust the course according to the group's preferences:

After this course, you'll have come closer to the B1 level and have the tools and strategies to get there and beyond.

Not sure if you should enroll in the A2 or B1 course?

Take this placement test

Any questions?

Inquiry

Beginners A2

This intensive course is for language learners striving toward the A2 level. The language of instruction is English/Portuguese typically in a 30/70 ratio. (I always speak with you in Portuguese as much as possible.)

CEFR Scale

Learn more about the CEFR scale

My suggestion for these two weeks is to focus on:

  • Listening comprehension
  • Oral interaction
  • Past tense (Perfeito vs. Imperfeito)
  • Prepositional usage
  • Any other aspects according to your preferences as a group

After this course, you'll have come closer to the A2 level and gained the tools to take it further all by yourself.

Not sure if you should enroll in the A2 or B1 course?

Take this placement test

Any questions?

Inquiry

Beginners A1

This intensive course is for language learners striving toward the A1 level. The language of instruction is English/Portuguese typically in a 60/40 ratio. (I always speak with you in Portuguese as much as possible.)

If you've just started your learning journey, it may be that you will find this course a bit challenging. Nothing wrong with that. However, if you want to take it easy, consider enrolling for the Clean Slate A0 instead (if available).

CEFR Scale

Learn more about the CEFR scale

This is an all-round course, which means that we’ll work on all aspects of language learning according to the A1 level*:

  • Pronunciation
  • Listening comprehension
  • Reading comprehension
  • Conversation
  • Grammar

* There's always room to adjust the course according to your preferences as a group.

After this course, you'll have come closer to the A1 level and gained the tools to take it further all by yourself.

Not sure if you should enroll in the A1 or A2 course?

Take this placement test

Any questions?

Inquiry

Clean Slate A0

Geared toward Absolute Beginners, this course gives you a solid start and foundation to build upon. The language of instruction is almost entirely in English.

CEFR Scale

This is an introductory course to the Portuguese language as spoken in Portugal. Throughout the course, we will focus on the Portuguese sound system and basic Portuguese grammar.

You will also learn how to introduce yourself and day-to-day, useful phrases. Finally, we will discuss learning resources and strategies to support your learning journey.

After the course, you will have a basic understanding of European Portuguese pronunciation and grammar. You will also be capable of engaging in simple, short oral interactions. Last but not least, you will be aware of a variety of learning resources and strategies to help you succeed at learning the language.

Any questions?

Inquiry

New dates covering the period Mar–Jun will soon be announced. Fill up this form and I will keep you posted.

Online Intensive Courses Upcoming
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Can't you attend any courses this season? Fill up this form and I will keep you posted on upcoming Intensive Courses.

In-person Intensive Courses Upcoming
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Surprise surprise!

Do you know what constipado means in Portuguese? Probably not what you are thinking...

Get a list of 50+ English-Portuguese False Friends and be surprised.

False Friends
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Letter X in Portuguese – How to Pronounce It

Regarding pronunciation, the letter X is quite challenging for those learning Portuguese. Here is why:

In Portuguese, the letter X stands for four different language sounds, namely, the /ʃ/-sound (as in shape), the /ks/-sound (as in tax), the /z/-sound (as in zen), and the /s/-sound (as in sun).

Luckily, there are a few spelling patterns that will make it easier for you. Learning these patterns and keeping them in the back of your mind will allow you, in most cases, to guess it right.

If you want to dive into the letter X in specific and the Portuguese sound system at large, consider enrolling in Portuguese Sounds.

I will see you there. /p

IPA – International Phonetic Alphabet

The symbols in the paragraph above, the ones enclosed in forward-slashes, are IPA symbols and refer to language sounds across all languages regardless of their specific scripts. 

Read the following article if you want to learn the IPA symbols specifically concerning the Portuguese language: Portuguese pronunciation: a helpful guide to Portuguese basic sounds and spelling patterns.

/ʃ/-sound

The most common language sound produced by X is, by far, the /ʃ/-sound (as is ashes). Let’s look at a few spelling patterns rendering the /ʃ/-sound.

Words starting with X

Virtually all Portuguese words starting with an X render the /ʃ/-sound. Here’re a few examples: 

  • xeque (check)
  • xarope (syrup)
  • xerife (sheriff)
  • xenofobia (xenophobia)
  • xícara (tea-cup)
  • . . .

X in front of a consonant

Also, whenever the letter X stands right in front of another consonant, it will produce the /ʃ/-sound. Many of the words in this group have English cognates wherein the X renders a /ks/-sound instead:

  • texto (text)
  • explorar (explore)
  • extremo (extreme)
  • expectativa (expectation)
  • exterior (exterior)
  • . . .

X in between vowels

The letter X is more devious when it is stuck in between vowels. In that case, there are three possibilities and no definitive rules. Yet, in most cases, X will render the /ʃ/-sound as before. Take a look at the following examples:

  • baixo (short)
  • ameixa (plum)
  • queixa (complaint)
  • lixo (garbage)
  • puxar (pull)
  • . . .

Again, when stuck in between vowels, the letter X can also render language sounds other than the /ʃ/-sound. Let’s take a look at those cases.

/ks/-sound

The letter X produces a /ks/-sound (as in accident) when stuck in between vowels. Often, these words have English cognates that are also pronounced with the same /ks/-sound. Take a look at these examples:

  • complexo (complex)
  • taxonomia (taxonomy)
  • fluxo (flux)
  • xico (toxic)
  • axioma (axiom)
  • . . .

/z/-sound

The letter X can also stand for the /z/-sound (as in zealous). Typically, these words have English cognates *, although the latter will render the /gz/-sound instead:

  • exausto (exhaust)
  • exagero (exaggeration)
  • exílio (exile)
  • exame (exam)
  • exótico (exotic)
  • . . . 

* Speaking of cognates, you may know more Portuguese words than you think you do. Here’s something to give your vocabulary a real boost: English-Portuguese cognates – the words you already know (without knowing it).

/s/-sound

Finally, the letter X can also stand for the /s/-sound (as in sow). However, this is rare and you should look at it as an exception:

  • próximo (next)
  • ximo (maximum)
  • auxílio (help)
  • . . .

Stay tuned for upcoming courses, reads, and other novelties.

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